Measuring right the first time production

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chrisn
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Measuring right the first time production

Post by chrisn » Wed Oct 12, 2011 7:39 am

Wondering if anyone is attempting to capture Right the First time metrics for manufacturing and if so how did they go about it.

I work in the chemical process industry and the corporation would like to start measuring right the first time, production.

There are proabaly many ways to do this but right now we are leaning towards using inspection points (anything more than 1 would be a failure) or using data that is sent to BW which at the moment is zero.

Looking more for an overall approach then details at the moment.

Donk
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Re: Measuring right the first time production

Post by Donk » Tue Oct 18, 2011 3:39 am

There's probably a number of better ways to tackle this, but one thing we've done is to use a lot of single results recording in inspection lots; any parameters that are measured out of spec are recorded, the lab or operator makes notes on any adjustments made, and then subsequent results (presumably in-spec) are recorded in the same lot. The initial OOS result is marked as invalid so that it doesn't contribute to the average, but the valuation is left at rejected. We have some BW reports that look for these instances, and calculates the 'right first time' based on the premise that if any 1 inspection lot for a material / batch, it counts against the right first time total.

Inspection points sounds promising as well, we just used the above method because it fit a little better with the existing inspection plan setup in most cases.

Regards,
John

chrisn
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Re: Measuring right the first time production

Post by chrisn » Wed Oct 19, 2011 6:21 am

Thanks John, we don't use single result recording for the most part so we'd have to make some changes in order to do it this way.

I guess what I am concerned about is the way they are talking about measuring this. I'm not sure it's going to give them any meaningful information.

What they want to do is if there are more than insp point created then it fails first pass quality. The problem I see is that many/most of the processes will send a sample to the lab make adjustements and resend another sample, but most processes have as part of the SOP a step to do this and it could be one or more samples.

I personally think we are running before we walk and maybe should take a step back and look at First Pass Yield instead.

This way we create say a process order to make 100,000 kg and then we would measure the quantity that was posted as good stock vs rejected or rework.
Last edited by chrisn on Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

Craig
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Re: Measuring right the first time production

Post by Craig » Wed Oct 19, 2011 9:58 am

This is always a problem at any company and is pretty much unique based on the product or business. I knew of one compnay that allowed one water adjustment for certain materials that were slurries or other water based solutions. More than one water adjustment it would fail 1st time right. But for other products in the same business, there was no one time adjustment. So how do you account for that in the same business?

If you go with your idea of just using yield, you could wind up making many adjustments to the material before receipting it.

I knew a company that allowed as many "03" samples as needed, (inspection points), but only one 04 sample. Of course this resulted in many 03 samples and they almost never had an 04 sample fail. Kind of defeats the purpose of the statistic.

The most strict way is to allow one "04" sample to be taken and require receipt of the material at that time. If the material is failed, the lot is rejected an the material moved to block stock. A rework process order is created if the material can be adjusted and salvaged. This would be similar to your idea Chris as reciepted material against the original orders can be looked at with regards to blocked and unblocked stock. The problem is that this then requires production to create a new process order, (with different order type), unblock the blocked stock, consume it on the new order, consume any additional materials used for correction and re-receive in the material creating a new 04 inspection lot. (same batch number is usually maintained).

This is the way I believe SAP intended it to be done in a perfect world and as a best practice. Additional labor, machine time, etc.. can then all be captured in the re-work order and real costs for rework can be analyzed.

However,in the real world of manufacturing, good luck at getting production to do that extra work. In addition, when material is in reactor or silo, your original order is usually for a packaged form of the material. So you may need to create an intermediate material that is receipted instead when the material is OOS. The intermediate material is then used with the rework process order. This can greatly increase the number of material masters needed.

Craig

chrisn
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Re: Measuring right the first time production

Post by chrisn » Wed Oct 19, 2011 11:27 am

Craig right now from what I am hearing and I haven't seen any details is that they want to count only 04's and only if one insp point is created and exclude the rest but as you said any production guy worried about getting dinged on quality could start submitting then to the lab as manual 89 which they said they would ignore.

To me we aren't at point where you make a batch and just bake it like a cake and out it comes. There many variables in a process and most require some adjustments as the batch is being made. Tome it's like saying let's bake a cake you add the ingredients without giving it a taste test to see if say it needs more salt. That would be ridiculous to say that because you had to add some extra salt before you cooked the cake you didn't make it right the first time and so the production line would get dinged with a low number (whatever way we figure out how to report it) yet might still have made a perfectly good cake, what's the poitn in that.

Well I can see a point and that would be if you are trying to reduce cycle times, adding that extra salt took some extra time and if it wasn't done the cake would have been out of the oven sooner but I think we are far away from that stage we aren't really measurig much of anything at the moment.

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